10 Worst States for Healthcare: South Carolina #8

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New research out from personal finance site Wallethub, has compared the 50 U.S.states and the District of Columbia across three key dimensions — health costs, access and outcomes — consisting of 40 relevant metrics.

The study looked at with metrics ranging from “average monthly insurance premium” to “number of physicians per capita” and “percentage of adults and children with health insurance coverage.”

Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale, with a score of 100 representing the best health care at the most reasonable cost. The study determined each state and the District’s weighted average across all metrics to calculate its overall score and used the resulting scores to rank-order our sample.

According to those findings, these 10 states have the worst healthcare in the country.

10.? Florida

Overall score: 47.04
Costs ranking: 39
Access ranking: 47
Outcomes ranking: 39

9.? Georgia

Overall score: 46.51
Costs ranking: 30
Access ranking: 50
Outcomes ranking: 42

8.? South Carolina

Overall score: 46.14
Costs ranking: 49
Access ranking: 32
Outcomes ranking: 41

7.? Oklahoma

Overall score: 45.59
Costs ranking: 41
Access ranking: 33
Outcomes ranking: 46

6.? Alabama

Overall score: 44.03
Costs ranking: 44
Access ranking: 44
Outcomes ranking: 44

5.? North Carolina

Overall score: 43.98
Costs ranking: 50
Access ranking: 46
Outcomes ranking: 30

4.? Arkansas

Overall score: 43.22
Costs ranking: 37
Access ranking: 31
Outcomes ranking: 50

3.? Alaska

Overall score: 41.78
Costs ranking: 51
Access ranking: 37
Outcomes ranking: 22

2.? Mississippi

Overall score: 41.53
Costs ranking: 42
Access ranking: 26
Outcomes ranking: 51

1.? Louisiana

Overall score: 41.14
Costs ranking: 48
Access ranking: 39
Outcomes ranking: 49

South Carolina Ranked 3rd Worst State for Dangerous Roads in Latest Study

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Wall Street 24/7 has released its latest study of United States Roadways, ranking the safest and most unsafe by state.? Coming in as the safest state is Rhode Island with Mississippi coming in as the worst.? Six of the top ten worst regionally fall in the Southeast with South Carolina coming in this year’s survey as the 3rd worst state for roadway safety.

Here is how the Top 10 in both categories ranked.

Top 10 Most Dangerous Roads

10. Louisiana
> Road deaths per 100,000: 16.2
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 757 (19th most)
> Seat belt use: 88%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Martin Luther King’s Birthday (14 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 49%

9. Oklahoma
> Road deaths per 100,000: 17.4
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 683 (21st most)
> Seat belt use: 87%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Labor Day (8 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 62%

8. Montana
> Road deaths per 100,000: 18.2
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 190 (11th least)
> Seat belt use: 76%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Labor Day (4 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 89%

7. Arkansas
> Road deaths per 100,000: 18.2
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 545 (25th most)
> Seat belt use: 75%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Memorial Day (9 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 66%

6. Kentucky
> Road deaths per 100,000: 18.8
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 834 (16th most)
> Seat belt use: 87%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Columbus Day (11 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 73%

5. Wyoming
> Road deaths per 100,000: 19.1
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 112 (4th least)
> Seat belt use: 81%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Columbus Day (2 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 81%

4. New Mexico
> Road deaths per 100,000: 19.3
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 402 (20th least)
> Seat belt use: 92%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Columbus Day (10 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 56%

3. South Carolina
> Road deaths per 100,000: 20.5
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 1,015 (13th most)
> Seat belt use: 94%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Martin Luther King’s Birthday (16 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 60%

2. Alabama
> Road deaths per 100,000: 21.3
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 1,038 (11th most)
> Seat belt use: 92%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Columbus Day (18 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 62%

1. Mississippi
> Road deaths per 100,000: 23.1
> 2016 roadway fatalities: 690 (20th most)
> Seat belt use: 78%
> Deadliest holiday in 2016: Independence Day (11 fatal crashes)
> Fatal crashes on rural roads: 98%

Top 10 Safest

  1. Rhode Island
  2. New York
  3. Massachusetts
  4. New Jersey
  5. Minnesota
  6. Washington
  7. Connecticut
  8. Maryland
  9. Hawaii
  10. Illinois

Note:? 9 of the top 10 Safest are Northern States

Methodology

To rank the safest and most dangerous states to drive in the United States, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed roadway fatality data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety along with urban and rural travel data from the Federal Highway Administration, each for 2016. The number of fatal roadway deaths was then adjusted for the population, noted as fatalities per 100,000 residents. Seat belt use rates and the share of fatal accidents on rural roads are also from IIHS and are all for 2016. Fatal injuries due to vehicle accidents include pedestrian and cyclist fatalities. Data on holiday deaths are for 2016 and came from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System.

Charleston, S.C. Ranked #3 Most Prosperous City Based on Latest RentCafe Study

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RentCafé has just completed a survey of the most prosperous cities in the United States based on six indicators.

To get an idea of how cities compare to each other in terms of prosperity, RentCafé measured increases across six indicators—population, income, home value, higher education, poverty rate and unemployment rating—from 2000 to 2016. The final standings were based on the combined value of all ranks.

As for cities with positive changes in all prosperity indicators, Odessa, Texas ranked at the top, followed by Washington, D.C, Charleston, S.C., and Brownsville, Texas. At the bottom of the list across all prosperity indicators? Rockford, Ill., landed the last spot with Toledo, Ohio, and Mesquite, Texas, not far behind.

Here are the top five most prosperous cities in the U.S.:

  1. Odessa, Texas

Population Change: 25 percent
Income Change: 38 percent
Home Value Change: 91 percent
Higher Education Change: 26 percent
Poverty Rate Change: -36 percent
Unemployment Rate Change: -24 percent

  1. Washington, D.C.

Population Change: 15 percent
Income Change: 30 percent
Home Value Change: 135 percent
Higher Education Change: 42 percent
Poverty Rate Change: -11 percent
Unemployment Rate Change: -19 percent

  1. Charleston, S.C.

Population Change: 35 percent
Income Change: 16 percent
Home Value Change: 39 percent
Higher Education Change: 34 percent
Poverty Rate Change: -15 percent
Unemployment Rate Change: -10 percent

  1. Fontana, Calif.

Population Change: 60 percent
Income Change: 3 percent
Home Value Change: 60 percent
Higher Education Change: 57 percent
Poverty Rate Change: 3 percent
Unemployment Rate Change: 18 percent

  1. North Charleston, S.C.

Population Change: 34 percent
Income Change: -3 percent
Home Value Change: 59 percent
Higher Education Change: 53 percent
Poverty Rate Change: -2 percent
Unemployment Rate Change: -1 percent

Not many cities (only 11 out of over 300) reported improvements across all indicators. This just means many cities focus on big improvements across one or two indicators instead of minor improvements in all categories.

Complete Rentcafe.com Study

Charleston Ranks #5 for Instagram Photos Per Population Resident in Latest Study

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We conducted an analysis of 29 United States cities known for business, tourism, population and education.? All falling under mid and large sized categories based on U.S. Census data.

We examined the hashtags of each city and how many Instagram photos are tagged to each city.? Then we looked at the July 1, 2017 latest census population data to determine how many pictures are taken per resident of each city.

Based on review of the 29 cities, Charleston ranked as the 5th highest ratio with 23.16 Instagram photos per resident.? We also looked at Charleston County as a whole, combining #Charleston, #NorthCharleston, #MountPleasant, #IsleofPalms, #SullivansIsland and #FollyBeach, and the ranking dropped to #15 with 9.45 Instagram photos per resident.

Here are the full rankings

  1. #Orlando – 45.64 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  2. #LasVegas – 42.91 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  3. #Boston – 23.94 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  4. #SanFrancisco – 23.66 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  5. #Charleston – 23.16 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  6. #Seattle – 21.70 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  7. #NewOrleans – 18.33 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  8. #Miami – 18.14 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  9. #Pittsburgh – 16.01 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  10. #SanDiego – 13.60 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  11. #Portland – 13.19 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  12. #Denver – 12.66 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  13. #Cleveland – 12.29 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  14. #LosAngeles – 10.65 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  15. Charleston County / Lowcounty – 9.45 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  16. #Austin – 9.07 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  17. #Dallas – 8.76 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  18. #WashingtonDC – 8.70 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  19. #StLouis – 8.17 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  20. #SaltLakeCity – 7.29 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  21. #Minneapolis – 6.96 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  22. #Houston – 6.40 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  23. #Charlotte – 5.97 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  24. #Memphis – 5.22 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  25. #KansasCity – 4.79 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  26. #Philadelphia – 4.36 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  27. #Phoenix – 3.40 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  28. #Jacksonville – 2.38 Instagram Photos Per Resident
  29. #NewYorkCity – 2.25 Instagram Photos Per Resident

 

New Study Ranks Charleston, S.C. the Worst Place to Start a Small Business

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RewardExpert has its study on the Best and Worst places to start a small business.? The study compared 177 metropolitan areas with more than 250,000 residents, using 30 data points in nine categories to determine which metropolitan areas will give your small business or tech startup the best chance to survive and succeed, and which ones will present you with the most daunting of challenges.

Based on the results, Charleston, South Carolina is ranked as the worst city to start a small business.

First let us provide a list of the Top 10 cities

  1. Denver / Aurora / Lakewood, Colorado
  2. Boston / Cambridge / Newton, Massachusetts
  3. Bridgeport / Stamford / Norwalk, Connecticut
  4. Minneapolis / St. Paul / Bloomington, Minnesota
  5. Madison, Wisconsin
  6. Lincoln, Nebraska
  7. Hartford / East Hartford / West Hartford, Connecticut
  8. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  9. Fort Collins, Colorado
  10. Austin / Round Rock, Texas

Worst Places to Start a Small Business

  1. Charleston / North Charleston South Carolina
  2. Florida Panhandle Region
  3. Inland Empire and Bakersfield, California
  4. California’s Central Coast (Santa Maria-Santa Barbara-San Luis Obispo-Salinas)
  5. Central Valley, California (Fresno-Visalia-Porterville-Merced-Modesto-Stockton-Lodi, California
  6. Huntington-Ashland, West Virginia-Kentucky
  7. Provo / Urem, Utah
  8. Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi
  9. Port St. Lucie, Florida
  10. Clarksville, Tennessee / Kentucky

Charleston / North Charleston, South Carolina Logic

The Charleston, South Carolina, metropolitan area comes in as the number one least-favorable place to start a small business for a number of reasons. In the first place, office rents are a sky-high $23.60 per square foot, well above the national average of $17.15 per square foot. Second, housing costs are above the national average for both renters (median monthly rent is $975 versus $803 nationally) and owners ($1,367 versus $1,217). Third, public transit is infrequent and underutilized, with only 1 percent of Charleston area commuters using public transportation. And finally, the area business ownership rate is below average, in the 8th percentile, with a very low percentage of startups (0.89 percent), and a below average five-year survival rate of 48.32 percent.

Compete Study Results

South Carolina 7th Worst State for Millennials

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Money Rates has ranked the best and worst states for millenials in their new 2017 study.? Based on the following eight factors: job market for young adults, young adult proportion of population, college tuition affordability, residential rental availability, residential rental affordability, access to high-speed internet, concentration of bars relative to the young adult population and concentration of fitness facilities to the young adult population.

Based on the current results, South Carolina is the 7th worst state for millennials to live in the United States.

Worst States for Millennials 2017

While just about every state has both strengths and weaknesses, the following states seemed to have the most negatives as places for young adults to live:

1. Arizona

?Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 1. Arizona

This state is known more as a retirement destination than as a hot spot for young people, and a look at where Arizona ranked in some categories of interest to millennials helps explain why. Arizona was among the 10 worst states for access to high-speed broadband and for the concentration of fitness facilities relative to the young adult population. In fact, Arizona ranked below-median in seven of the eight categories used in this study.

2. New Hampshire (tie)

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 2. New Hampshire

This is an especially bad choice if you are looking to attend college and money is an issue: at $15,650, the annual cost of in-state tuition at a four-year public school is the highest in the nation, more than 60 percent higher than in the typical state. New Hampshire is also not a great place to go for night life, with the second-lowest concentration of bars relative to the size of its young adult population. New Hampshire also ranked in the bottom 10 for both access to high-speed broadband and rental availability.

However, New Hampshire does have one very important redeeming feature for young adults looking for work: The unemployment rate for people aged 20 to 24 is just 4.2 percent, the lowest in the nation.

2. Virginia (tie)

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 3. Virginia

Surprisingly, given its proximity to Washington D.C., Virginia is not a great place for night life, with the nation’s lowest concentration of bars relative to its number of young people. To put this in perspective, according to Census figures, Virginia has fewer bars than tiny Rhode Island, despite having about eight times as many young adults. Another key drawback for people just starting out is that it is a fairly expensive place to live. Both tuition and rents are among the 10 most expensive in the nation.

4. Washington

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 4. Washington

Since young people tend to rent rather than own their homes, a crucial knock on Washington is that it can be a tough place to find a place to rent. The rental vacancy rate is the third-lowest in the nation. Besides that, Washington ranked better than average in only one category, which was the concentration of fitness facilities relative to the size of the young adult population.

5. Tennessee

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 5. Tennessee

Whether you fall on the party-animal or the health-nut end of the personal life style spectrum, Tennessee is not a particularly welcoming state. Relative to the size of its young adult population, Tennessee ranked 44th for concentration of bars, and 41st for concentration of fitness facilities. It is a relatively easy place for renters to find a place to live, as it ranked better than average for both availability and affordability of rental properties.

6. Oregon

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 6. Oregon

Like neighboring Washington, Oregon suffers from a relative scarcity of rental properties, ranking 45th in that category. It was generally ranked below average across the board, except that it does cater to young people with relatively high concentrations of bars and fitness facilities.

7. South Carolina

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 7. South Carolina

Clearly, young people are not especially attracted to this state because its percentage of 20- to-24-year-olds ranks in the bottom five nationally. One turn-off may be the expense of college in South Carolina, with an average in-state tuition cost for a four-year public school that is among the 10 most expensive in the country.

8. New Jersey

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 8. New Jersey

Expense is a big drawback to New Jersey for young adults on a tight budget. Tuition and rental costs are both among the five most expensive in the U.S. Those high costs are even tougher to afford in a weak job market, and New Jersey suffers from one of the 10 highest rates of young adult unemployment.

9. Kentucky

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 9. Kentucky

This state ranked below average on five of eight criteria, with the most prominent example being a bottom-five ranking for concentration of fitness facilities. On the plus side, rents are fourth cheapest of all the states.

10. California

Worst States for Millennials 2017 - 10. California

Of course, California attracts a lot of young people, but this study is a reminder that you should kick the tires before you choose a place to live. Specifically, make sure you can line up a place to live before you commit because California has the lowest availability of rental property, and the third highest rental costs.

Of course, not all millennials think and act the same way. The above descriptions of strengths of weaknesses of different states offer some suggestions for what young people might want to look at when choosing where to move, but each person will prioritize and judge those factors differently.

Methodology

Methodology

To get a handle on some of the factors that may be driving decisions about where millennials choose to live, MoneyRates.com looked at the following eight factors:

  • Job market for young adults (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)
  • Young adult proportion of population (U.S. Census Bureau data)
  • College tuition affordability (Four-year in-state cost data from the College Board)
  • Residential rental availability (U.S. Census Bureau data)
  • Residential rental affordability (U.S. Census Bureau data)
  • Access to high-speed broadband?internet (Federal government’s National Broadband Map)
  • Concentration of bars relative to the young adult population (U.S. Census Bureau data)
  • Concentration of fitness facilities relative to the young adult population (International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association)

All 50 states plus the District of Columbia were ranked on each of the above criteria, and then average rankings across all eight categories were calculated.

Based on the results, the following are the 10 Best and Worst States for Millennials in 2017:

Full Ranking of Best States for Millennials 2017

Didn’t see your home state in the best or worst lists? Look below for the full ranking of all 50 states and Washington D.C. and see where you stand:

Overall Rank State
1 North Dakota
2 South Dakota
3 Nebraska
4 Louisiana
5 Wyoming
6 Iowa
7 Kansas
7 Wisconsin
9 Montana
10 Indiana
11 Idaho
12 Florida
13 Nevada
14 Mississippi
15 Texas
16 District of Columbia
17 Arkansas
17 Minnesota
19 Delaware
19 Utah
21 Missouri
22 Michigan
23 Alabama
23 Maryland
25 Oklahoma
26 Ohio
26 Pennsylvania
28 Massachusetts
29 Alaska
30 Connecticut
31 New Mexico
31 New York
31 Rhode Island
34 Illinois
35 Colorado
36 West Virginia
37 Hawaii
38 Georgia
39 North Carolina
40 Vermont
41 Maine
42 California
43 Kentucky
44 New Jersey
45 South Carolina
46 Oregon
47 Tennessee
48 Washington
49 New Hampshire
49 Virginia
51 Arizona

Charleston/North Charleston Ranked #37 Fattest Cities in the United States

According to the 2017 findings from WalletHub.com, Charleston/North Charleston, SC was ranked as the 37th fattest city in the United States.? Below is the methodology and the ranking of the top 100 worst states in obesity.

Methodology

In order to determine the fattest places in America, WalletHub’s analysts compared 100 of the most populated U.S. metro areas across three key dimensions:

  • Obesity & Overweight
  • Weight-Related Health Problems
  • Healthy Environment.

They evaluated those dimensions using 17 relevant metrics, which are listed below with their corresponding weights. Each metric was graded on a 100-point scale, with a score of 100 representing the “fattest.” Data for metrics marked with an asterisk (*) were available only at the state level.

The team then calculated the overall score for each city based on its weighted average across all metrics and used the resulting scores to construct its final ranking.

Obesity & Overweight – Total Points: 50

  • Share of Overweight Adults: Full Weight (~11.11 Points)
  • Share of Obese Adults: Full Weight (~11.11 Points)
  • Share of Overweight Teenagers: Half*Weight (~5.56 Points) (Note: “Teenagers” includes persons aged 14 to 18.)
  • Share of Obese Teenagers: Half* Weight (~5.56 Points) (Note: “Teenagers” includes persons aged 14 to 18.)
  • Share of Overweight Children: Half* Weight (~5.56 Points) (Note: “Children” includes persons aged 10 to 17.)
  • Share of Obese Children: Half* Weight (~5.56 Points) (Note: “Children” includes persons aged 10 to 17. )
  • Projected Obesity Rates by 2030: Half* Weight (~5.56 Points)

Weight-Related Health Problems – Total Points: 30

  • Share of Physically Inactive Adults: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Share of Adults Eating Fewer than One Serving of Fruits/Vegetables per Day: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Share of Adults with High Cholesterol: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Share of Diabetic Adults: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Share of Adults with High Blood Pressure: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Heart-Disease Rate: Full Weight (~4.62 Points)
  • Obesity-Related Death Rate: Half* Weight (~2.31 Points)

Healthy Environment – Total Points: 20

  • Active Lifestyle: Quadruple Weight (~13.33 Points) (Note: This metric is based on data from WalletHub’s Best & Worst Cities for an Active Lifestyle ranking.)
  • Access to Parks & Recreational Facilities: Full Weight (~3.33 Points)
  • Access to Healthy Food: Full Weight (~3.33 Points) (Note: This metric measures the percentage of urban-area residents who earn a low income and live more than 1 mile from a grocery store or supermarket.)

Sources: Data used to create this ranking were collected from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, County Health Rankings, United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Trust for America’s Health and WalletHub research.

Source: WalletHub

Fattest Cities in America

Overall Rank (1 = ‘Fattest’) Metro Area Total Score ‘Obesity & Overweight’ Rank ‘Weight-Related Health Problems’ Rank ‘Healthy Environment’ Rank
1 Jackson, MS 84.93 2 1 22
2 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 82.78 3 8 1
3 Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, AR 82.12 4 3 14
4 McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX 82.10 6 2 7
5 Shreveport-Bossier City, LA 81.82 1 5 18
6 Chattanooga, TN-GA 79.23 17 7 20
7 Mobile, AL 78.86 14 6 30
8 Lafayette, LA 77.03 5 12 52
9 Winston-Salem, NC 76.74 39 16 2
10 Knoxville, TN 76.73 25 19 23
11 Columbia, SC 76.54 9 29 24
12 Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, SC 76.34 13 32 12
13 Birmingham-Hoover, AL 76.03 16 10 25
14 San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 75.80 6 47 3
15 Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 75.57 10 15 27
16 Myrtle Beach-Conway-North Myrtle Beach, SC-NC 75.20 12 39 33
17 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX 75.05 15 21 9
18 Oklahoma City, OK 74.83 19 26 10
19 Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC 74.48 49 9 31
20 Baton Rouge, LA 74.33 8 4 39
21 Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, IN 74.14 34 23 6
22 El Paso, TX 74.13 21 22 11
23 Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN 73.94 20 34 16
24 Tulsa, OK 73.74 24 20 26
25 Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 73.70 26 42 5
26 Toledo, OH 73.44 36 31 4
27 Huntsville, AL 73.43 22 89 35
28 Greensboro-High Point, NC 73.31 29 24 15
29 Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI 73.17 31 11 28
30 Columbus, OH 73.00 35 27 8
31 Canton-Massillon, OH 72.89 38 17 46
32 Wichita, KS 72.87 28 28 13
33 Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC 72.31 33 25 21
34 Lexington-Fayette, KY 72.19 23 14 42
35 Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, AR-MO 71.71 27 72 29
36 Fort Wayne, IN 71.58 32 18 34
37 Charleston-North Charleston, SC 71.44 18 71 60
38 New Orleans-Metairie, LA 71.22 11 13 45
39 Jacksonville, FL 69.91 61 35 17
40 Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI 69.54 44 45 56
41 Richmond, VA 69.22 59 33 51
42 Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ 68.88 53 30 79
43 Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA 68.73 57 53 40
44 Asheville, NC 68.30 63 69 36
45 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 68.23 54 46 32
46 Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA 67.86 68 38 66
47 Dayton, OH 67.58 51 62 59
48 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 67.48 79 63 19
49 Worcester, MA-CT 66.57 80 36 75
50 Raleigh, NC 66.30 50 75 37
51 Kansas City, MO-KS 66.20 60 60 38
51 Albuquerque, NM 66.20 42 64 43
53 Akron, OH 66.11 62 65 61
54 Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, IL-IN-WI 66.03 45 55 44
55 Providence-Warwick, RI-MA 66.01 76 43 84
56 Springfield, MA 65.97 77 54 74
57 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ 65.30 40 56 57
58 Des Moines-West Des Moines, IA 65.05 71 78 47
59 Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD 65.05 46 49 54
60 Portland-South Portland, ME 64.41 70 92 64
61 Anchorage, AK 64.32 43 59 63
62 Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA 64.18 47 58 62
63 Manchester-Nashua, NH 64.10 84 68 89
64 Spokane-Spokane Valley, WA 63.80 75 79 65
65 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 63.72 72 44 50
66 New Haven-Milford, CT 63.58 82 73 94
67 Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 63.36 30 57 67
68 Durham-Chapel Hill, NC 63.34 52 80 53
69 Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT 62.63 90 74 85
70 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 62.35 58 37 77
71 Austin-Round Rock, TX 62.29 37 90 49
72 St. Louis, MO-IL 61.82 69 40 76
73 Ogden-Clearfield, UT 61.77 92 76 72
74 Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN 61.24 41 41 82
75 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 61.24 78 52 70
76 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA 61.22 83 77 55
77 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL 60.77 73 70 69
78 Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV 60.63 66 50 80
79 Tucson, AZ 60.24 67 67 78
80 Cleveland-Elyria, OH 60.24 55 66 73
81 Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA 60.06 48 48 86
82 Pittsburgh, PA 59.79 56 61 93
83 Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT 59.72 89 95 99
84 Salt Lake City, UT 58.85 97 82 91
85 Provo-Orem, UT 58.47 98 98 41
86 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 57.66 65 84 92
87 Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 57.53 85 51 97
88 San Diego-Carlsbad, CA 57.28 81 81 87
89 Reno, NV 57.18 87 83 83
90 Boise, ID 56.46 74 85 96
91 Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA 56.44 64 88 98
92 San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 55.76 96 100 48
93 San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA 55.72 93 97 71
94 Honolulu, HI 55.45 94 91 81
95 Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH 54.75 95 87 90
96 Colorado Springs, CO 54.00 99 93 68
97 Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO 53.53 100 99 58
98 Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 53.46 86 96 88
99 Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA 52.04 88 86 100
100 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 51.93 91 94 95