What is your Charleston Story? We want to hear your stories of inspiration, courage and celebration

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Do you have a great Charleston story?? There are so many inspiring stories in the Holy City.? So many simple acts of kindness and extraordinary acts of courage and often unrecognized.? Part of our mission at Charleston Daily is to recognize those that contribute to the story.? We all have chapters in our life worth a voice.? It is time you shared your story.

Have any of these happened to you that you want to scream it from a rooftop to celebrate and inspire?

  • A loved one returned home after being away
  • A surgery saved a life
  • A selfless act of generosity
  • A soldier returned home safely
  • A great academic achievement
  • A skill that should be shared
  • An incredible business story
  • An act of incredible courage
  • A love story for the ages
  • A family member that inspires you…….

Email us at mark@charlestondaily.com and tell us a little about your story.? We want to do our best to help others hear it.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Desirable Places in Charleston, SC to Escape Life

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By Minta Pavliscsak

Ever have one of “those” days? Sure you have; we all have. The type of day where you just want to be alone and escape life for a bit. Between work, school, family, friends, and the constant connection with technology, places where you can just be alone are difficult to come by.

However, as long as you do not check in on Facebook or Yelp when you get there, you can seclude yourself and escape life if you wish to do so. Turn off your phone, bring a book, magazine, your puppy, a notebook, or simply your own thoughts, take a few deep breaths and enjoy your solitude.

Here are a few of the best hidden places in Charleston to escape life, if only for a few minutes.

Folly Beach: You have a few options here. The best places to go to be alone with your thoughts are as far east as you can go on the island, and as far west as you can go. On the east end you will enjoy a scenic view of Morris Island Lighthouse. The far west end is a bit further of a walk, but totally worth it. The walk there is part of the destination itself.

Charleston Waterfront Park swings at night: There’s not a sound much more soothing than the sound of water, and when accompanied by the feeling of gently swinging back and forth under the moonlight, worries seem to melt away. Bring a comfy sweatshirt, even in summertime as it tends to get a little chilly.

Melton Peter Demetre Park (formally Sunrise Park): If you want a unique view of Charleston and the surrounding areas, here is your spot. Nestled deep within James Island, this is the perfect place to start your day or spend the afternoon in peacefulness.? In the distance you can view the Cooper River Bridge or the church steeples of the peninsula.

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Allan Park

Fishing and Crabbing Dock at James Island County Park: Even if there is someone fishing, they usually just nod to say hi and focus on catching a big one. The dock is large enough for you to have your own spot to yourself. Bring your fishing pole, crab net, or just sit and enjoy the view.

Allan Park: Located just off of Ashley Avenue near Hampton Park, Allan Park is a splendid half acre of tranquility. There is a large fountain in the center and plenty of grass for picnics. There are also benches around the fountain if a blanket is not your thing.

Caw Caw Interpretive Center: Located about sixteen miles from downtown Charleston, Caw Caw Interpretive Center has remained virtually untouched over the years. Once several rice plantations, it is now home to a multitude of wildlife which you can enjoy along over six miles of trails winding throughout swamplands, cypress trees and boardwalks.

Magnolia Cemetery: Not many people think “relaxing” when it comes to cemeteries, but trust us on this one. Magnolia Cemetery is located on the banks of the Cooper River and in our opinion has to be one of the most beautiful places one could spend their resting days. Taking a stroll through this 92 acre stretch of land can give a whole new meaning to “escaping life”.

MUSC Urban Farm:? Right in the heart of the medical district off of Bee Street between Ashley and Courtenay is a safe haven.? In the heart of this square escape is an educational community garden where you will find everything from lemons, to rosemary to sunflowers with free gardening and nature lessons weekly.? Just outside the garden are open grassy areas and benches to relax, have a meal or just daydream.? Also, enclosed in this area are stretching equipment to keep your body physically fit.? This is a true mental and physical realm of health and solitude in the heart of the Charleston peninsula.

 

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Magnolia Cemetery

We know there are more, but we do not want to give away all of the secrets! If you have a favorite spot that you like to go to escape life and would like to share, please comment below.

Andrew Pinckney Inn Collects School Supplies for Teachers’ Supply Closet

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Andrew Pinckney Inn is partnering with the Teachers’ Supply Closet (TSC) to help get school supplies to local children for the 2017 school year. Now through Labor Day they will be collecting new or gently used school/office supplies in our lobby at 40 Pinckney Street. As a way to say thank you to our guests for supporting our cause, if you bring in at least three supplies we will offer one free night of valet parking during your stay*.

Teachers’ Supply Closet eliminates the need for teachers to pay for the products. They are a nonprofit affiliate of the national Kids In Need Foundation that provides free school supplies to teachers in Charleston, Dorchester and Berkeley Counties who work at schools where at least 81% of the students are on the free or reduced meals program. In 2016 they provided 27,550 children with free school supplies.

Top 5 Needs: ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
-Composition Notebooks
-Copy Paper
-Kleenex
-Hand Sanitizer ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?.
-Glue Sticks

Other Wish List Needs:
-Pencils
-Pink Erasers
-Washable Markers
-Pocket Folders
-Scissors
-Crayons

Drop Off Location:
Andrew Pinckney Inn
40 Pinckney Street, Charleston, SC

*Free valet parking is to be used during your current visit only and it is nontransferable. Good for one night only of parking, in exchange for a minimum of three separate school supplies.

Teacher Supplies Closet Mission: To serve children in the Tri-County area in meeting their educational and creative needs by providing free supplies donated by businesses and individuals.

Save The Landing Brave Sculpture at Charles Towne Landing

The following is from the petition started by Charleston’s Kelly Gaskins and can be found at?change.org:?

Charles Towne Landing is permanently removing their wooden Indian sculpture from the park with no plans to preserve it.

To honor Native Americans,? Peter Toth carved a sculpture called the Landing Brave and donated it to Charles Towne Landing in 1977. He donated his time and resources so that visitors would recognize the Native American contribution to our historical fabric. The carving depicts the?head of an Indian brave wearing a feather headdress. The magnificent sculpture was carved from an old oak tree and measures?approximately 22 x 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 ft.? Since 1977, The Landing Brave has not only served as a tribute to Native Americans but it has also been a backdrop to countless family photos of visiting travelers from all over the world!

According to the?park’s director of corporate communications the ridiculous reason for the Indian sculpture removal is because it is <quote> “not historically accurate to Charles Towne Landing.”? She stated the sculpture <quote> “does not depict the Kiawah (Indians), the Yemassee(Indians) or the Edisto (Indians) or any of the cultures that were in South Carolina at the time.”? According to the Landing Brave creator, Peter Toth, the sculpture is intended to pay tribute to the?Native American culture by highlighting the significance of the regional tribes in South Carolina.

This communications director also said the sculpture is a safety issue because of its age and rotting. When asked directly if anyone had been injured from the sculpture she said removing it is a preventative measure. Here’s why that doesn’t make sense: In 2005 the Landing Brave sculpture was restored and treated for termites. The creator, Peter Toth says the sculpture was carved from oak and should last 100+ years with minimal care. If the park wanted to, they could install a safety barrier around the sculpture. The park has no interest in preserving or maintaining the sculpture–just removing it permanently.

The Native Americans have always held a deep respect for the land and to take only what was needed, and to thank every plant, animal, or thing that was used. They were conservationists and ecologists long before this became popular. ?Charles Towne Landing now has an opportunity to follow the examples set forth by the Native American people by keeping & preserving this historically relevant sculpture.

Your help is absolutely necessary to save the Landing Brave sculpture! Your voices must be heard to demand it stays in the park for future visitors to enjoy! Here’s how you can help:

1.) Please sign the petition!

2.) Call or email the director of the state park service: Phil Gaines: pgaines@scprt.com
803-734-0345

3.) Post on the Charles Towne Landing YELP page: https://www.yelp.com/biz/charles-towne-landing-state-historic-site-charleston

4.) Post on the Charles Towne Landing Trip Advisor page: https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g54171-d144262-Reviews-Charles_Towne_Landing_State_Historic_Site-Charleston_South_Carolina.html

5.) Visit the park office at Charles Towne Landing or call to demand the Landing Brave stay in the park! They are located at 1500 Old Towne Rd, Charleston, SC 29407
PHONE: (843) 852-4200

PARK MANAGER: ROB POWELL

ASSISTANT PARK MANAGER: JASON ROBINETT

6.) Contact your media or lawmaker friends and request their help in raising awareness about the Landing Brave and making noise to keep it in the park!

This petition will be delivered to:
State Park Director: Phil Gaines

What Not to Do In Charleston

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By Minta Pavliscsak

It seems everywhere you look these days there are blogs popping up about what to do in Charleston. Having information about what to do and where to go is great, but sometimes it is good to know what not to do. Fear not! We have you covered. So enjoy your time in Charleston, but please keep in mind the following things not to do in Charleston, South Carolina:

– Do not stop in the middle of the road to take pictures of the big, beautiful houses. Again, that goes for cars and pedestrians, although we see it happen mostly with cars. Simply pull over and park, get out and walk around. You will get much better photographs and see so much more!

– Do not block the sidewalks. We all have places to go and people to see. While this is the south and time does seem to run a little slower here, we are still in a rush to get to where we need to be. Please be considerate of those behind you when walking down the sidewalk and make sure they have plenty of room to get around you.

– Do not let the door slam on the person walking in behind you. We are taught at a very early age to “hold the door” for others, especially southern gentlemen. When you don’t, it is nothing personal, but we take it as such. And it’s simply rude.

– Do not stop in the middle of the intersection. This goes for cars and pedestrians. The light stays green for only so long, and trust me it’s not very long. If you are unsure of where you are going, just get out of the way and then figure it out.

– Do not eat at Hymans. With so many other amazing options, try not to fall prey to the hype. But you definitely don’t have to take our word for it.

– Do not walk in the bike lane when walking across the Ravenel Bridge. The bikers will warn you that they are coming up behind you, but they will also come pretty dern close to running you over if you are in their lane.

– Do not pay for a taxi when getting around downtown. You have a couple of free options. The city has the DASH, a free downtown shuttle that has different routes that will get you all over the peninsula. There is also Scoop Charleston, a free electric taxi service that will get you anywhere you want to go in downtown Charleston.? The Rickshaw is just a fine Southern tradition and cozy way to get around town.

– Do not get to the bar late if you do not want to pay a cover charge. Going out at night? Try upper King Street or hit up the Market and East Bay area. However, be warned that there will be lines and cover charges.

– Do not bring alcohol on the beach. Folly Beach was the last beach in the area that allowed drinking on the beach. They banned alcohol on their beach in 2012 following a last straw Fourth of July incident. Some say just be smart about it; we say why risk it?

– Do not forget that everyone has their bad days. Sure, Charleston has been named one of the friendliest cities but whether you are a local or a tourist, things like what are listed above can -and will- bug anyone from time to time. Just be patient, smile, and remember the golden rule for in the end we all want our Charleston experience to be a great one.

Why Charleston Isn’t Always “Paradise”

By Mark A. Leon

If you spend any time on social media and frankly, you may have to be living in a bubble or underground not to, the phrase “paradise” is often thrown around when describing Charleston.? As an avid supporter of the beauty, culture, community and charm, it is often easy to do.? We also need to look at the big picture of a geographic region and understand, that reaching the plateau of paradise is often challenging or impossible.? Setting those expectations, can also set others to fail, by painting a false picture of “paradise”.

This article is meant as a tool of awareness that Charleston has its own set of challenges and daily wears.? Like any other city, we have our flaws and many we deal with regularly, while others are growing to potentially explosive proportions.

Here are some of the reasons, Charleston is not always “paradise”

  • Postal System Challenges:? If you are a local, the news that we have a poor postal system in Charleston County should come as no surprise.? From the long lines and slow service to the delayed delivery times, even for local postal items, there is tremendous room for improvement in our postal system.? Often, the daily home deliveries are inconsistent and not uniform.
  • Limited Nature Preserve Outdoor Options:? If you are an avid runner, hiker, biker or adventurer, the term Lowcountry has never had a more defined meaning.? If you are looking for mountains or waterfalls, the closest destinations are four hours plus away from Charleston.
  • Heavy Taxation:? Charleston County just approved in 2016 a 0.5% tax increase bringing sales tax to 9.0% (Higher than New York City).? Our restaurant food tax is 10.5% / restaurant alcohol is 15%.? In a 2016 study, South Carolina was rated the third worst driving state and this has resulted in increases in automobile insurance rates.? This author saw a 22% annual increase in insurance rates without any incident.? In 2018, the annual vehicle renewal fee has added 5 additional taxes to support county programs adding a 310% increase in annual vehicle fees.
  • Housing Costs:? If you are in the real estate market, you are capitalizing on a golden opportunity.? If you are looking to buy a home or rent, you need to do a bit of research, because it may be very costly.? We are in a housing bubble.? One that could grow or explode very quickly.? Recently, a house was sold on The Battery for a record $6.2 Million and houses throughout the county are seeing sharp rises.? This is also affecting rental costs on the peninsula.? In the Elliotborough Section, we found a 3 bedroom, 2 ? bath for $3600 a month.? In 2010, a two-bedroom ranged from $900 – $1300 a month.? Today, that same option is averaging $1600 – $2000.? With the added costs of utilities and internet, it is becoming a struggle to support downtown living.
  • Traffic: The only explanation this needs is experiencing this on a daily basis.? Whether you drive Savannah Highway, Bees Ferry, Highway 17, Interstate 526, Interstate 26, Folly Road or Calhoun Street, maneuvering through the Charleston area is nothing short of a driving nightmare.? If you have the unfortunate distinction of driving during rush hour or tidal flooding, the situation only gets worse.
Spring Street
Spring Street
  • Flooding:? Charleston is coastal living.? There is no denying the unquestionable beauty of the harbors and beaches, but there is also a sustainable issue about flooding on city streets and residential areas.? As an attendee of the recent mayoral debate, flooding was a critical topic throughout the discussion and remains today.? One consistent element the audience took away from the seven candidates, is that no one has a sustained answer on how to address and correct the issue.
  • Unspoken Racism: We are one of the friendliest cities in the country, if not the world.? We don’t protest or riot and we keep to ourselves except for the friendly smile or ‘hello’.? That doesn’t mean we opening believe in equality for all.? Charleston has a clear separation of black and white.? In economics, housing, lifestyle and treatment.? Southern racial tensions are high in Charleston and those that choose to ignore it, are making a clear statement as well.
  • Construction:? You would be hard pressed to remember a time in the last three plus years when there weren’t cranes, construction vehicles, cones or detours destroying the esthetics of The Holy City.? Drive down Lockwood, President Street, Spring Street, King Street, Calhoun or Meeting.? Watch out for potholes and construction workers.? It has been a long time since we didn’t have to walk through a construction tunnel or see a crane blocking one of our beautiful church steeples.
  • Affordability: We have a Mayor that campaigned on “livability”, yet failed to look at affordability as Charleston continues to grow to a “high end” residential and hospitality community.? With the new community taking over Sergeant Jasper, boutique shopping on Upper Meeting, Northern expansion of Upper King, high end hotel development and retail, Charleston is becoming less about appealing to locals and more about tourism.? That position was made very clear when in 2016 when Hughes Lumber, Bob Ellis Shoes and Morris Sokol Furniture closed (All local foundations that stayed in business from 60 to 100 plus years).
  • Identity Crisis: For those that don’t know, James Island resides under two jurisdictions, James Island and Charleston.? There are even two different garbage pick-ups in the same neighborhoods.? Is James Island part of Charleston or its own municipality?? West Ashley has fought for its own namesake for years, but it is still part of Charleston.? This identity crisis needs to be addressed.
  • Corporate Name Tags:? I moved to Charleston partly because of Jestine’s Kitchen and a local record store.? It was the small-town appeal that won me over.? Today, there are 9 Starbucks downtown, Five Guys Burgers, Chipotle, Panera, Subway, Moe’s, West Elm, Williams-Sonoma, Urban Outfitters, Forever 21, Godiva, Victoria’s Secret, American Apparel and an Apple Store. ?We expect those corporate name tags to continue to grow.
  • Lack of Ethnic Food: Food is king in Charleston.? Hello, ‘Top Chef’ just filmed here.? You can search the peninsula far and wide (Campus Food excluded) and you will find a large void in ethnic food options.? Traditional Southern cuisine owns downtown.? There are derivatives of that theme, but still one-sided.? If you want true ethnic options, North Charleston offers the best selection.
Radcliffe Street
Radcliffe Street
  • Cooper River Bridge and Ice – I will be the first to say, the Cooper River Bridge is one of the most beautiful bridges I have ever seen.? It is part of who we are and folks around the world identify us by its majestic span.? Many years ago, when the architectural designers laid plans and built this bridge, it came with a flaw, falling deadly icicles.? We don’t often get freezing level temperatures, but when we do, it can and has shut down the bridge that connects Mount Pleasant to Charleston over the harbor.? This shutdown forces traffic to detour to 526 and 26.? If you have lived through it, you have stories, but we don’t recommend it.
  • Rise in tourism and drop in local commerce is driving generational local businesses to sell or go under – The local Charleston community has witnessed dozens of local businesses, annually, closing due to lack of customer traffic and forced increases in rent opening the doors to large corporate retails outlets with deeper pockets.? Yet, the city pushes “buy local”.? Unfortunately, that message is not reaching the masses of tourists coming by boat, car and plane.

Debate and expressionism is healthy.? It breeds creativity and ignites change.? We hope this article opens your minds and reminds you that Charleston is a remarkable place to live, but we have areas that are not perfect.

We welcome your thoughts, comments or stories.

Is Mayor Tecklenburg’s Promise of “Livability” Real or a Hoax

Waterfront Park

By Mark A. Leon

Just over a year later, we look back at a promise.? During the Mayoral campaign that took two voting days to decide, Mayor John Tecklenburg stood behind the promise of making Charleston “livable” again.? It was a bold statement with much room for interpretation.

Now, we look to today and the future, and it has become clear that “livability” is not about the citizens that have chosen to live their days here in Charleston, but the tourists and the developers that are reaping the rewards of this once great city.

The politicians, media and tourism boards have boasted the year over year increases in tourism and high hotel occupancy rates.? What they haven’t spoken to is the flat GDP of just over 2%.? With double figure increases in tourism traffic and low economic growth, the indicator is that local residents are not coming to Historic Charleston as frequently as they once did.

This is also evident in the closing of local Charleston foundations including Morris Sokol, Hughes Lumber and Bob Ellis Shoes (stores that would be frequented by locals, not tourists).

In 2009, I would work from my downtown apartment on Morris Street for miles and take in esthetic beauty in all directions.? There were pockets of crowds and carriages all around, but that was part of the ambiance of this city.? What was not prevalent were orange cones, deep roadway damage, cranes and endless high rise construction in every major part of the city.? From Joe Riley Stadium, to MUSC, East Bay, King Street, Meeting Street and Broad Street.? This city is being attacked from all directions with the simple goal:? Make a few major developers and investors very wealthy.

Simply put, we are no longer in control of our city.

All the perks of being a local have been compromised and here is how we are suffering:

  • Parking garage rates have increased
  • Most residential parking is now only 1 hour for non-residents 24 hours a day
  • Restaurant tax is 10.5% for food / 15% for alcohol
  • The East Side lost its only means of groceries

Several weeks ago, a group of business owners met to finance free bus service for residents of the East Side to go to Mount Pleasant and Northern Charleston for groceries because their BiLo (Former Piggly Wiggly) closed-down.? Instead of celebrating this generous act, why aren’t we looking at why it wasn’t kept open in the first place.

Cistern Yard – College of Charleston

The Westside Neighborhood has trees uprooted from the sidewalk that are being ignored from the last devastating storm.

Yet, simultaneously,

  • A 1.2 billion-dollar development is going up on Upper Meeting
  • A new hotel is in development to compliment the newly launched hotel on Upper King
  • ?A new housing development is being built on Upper Meeting and Huger Street
  • Lockwood is setting the foundation for a new development
  • A new shopping and dining complex is under construction across from Joe Riley Stadium
  • Sergeant Jasper could see new community rise if all provisions are met.
  • Construction continues on the new MUSC Children’s Hospital
  • Approvals are being finalized for a new bank building on the corner of Calhoun and Meeting
  • King Street is closed off from the Crosstown for the next two years
  • Infrastructure and building construction on the College of Charleston campus

Several days ago, we joked that Charleston was no longer the “Holy City” but the “Crane City”.? Humor aside, there is a fear brewing in Charleston and we are on the sidelines without a means of getting in the game.

We have heard many speak on the social forums that they want the Northerners to stop moving here, yet Charleston is starting to look more like New York or Cleveland than Savannah or Beaufort.

As citizens of Charleston, we will not see our skyline or traffic alleviation from construction projects until 2020 or beyond.? Is that what we signed up for when we were promised “livability”?

We have a voice Charleston.? Maybe, it is time we start looking for answers.? We have local officials whom you have voted in to speak on our behalf.? Utilize them.

Spring Street

A Folly Starfish Christmas Story

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By Minta Pavliscsak

It was Christmas Eve in our little slice of Folly Under the Sea. This year things around me seemed more calm than usual. Everyfish seemed to be ahead of the typical hustle and bustle of the season. That is, every fish except for me. I like to live in the here and now, which means I am really good when it comes to what others view as procrastinating. I like to think of it more as I work well under pressure. That aside, I was bobbing from store to store as quickly as I could but a starfish can only go as fast as the current takes him and today the current was in no rush.

Somehow I managed to squeak in grocery shopping, picking up my famous last minute –but always perfect– gifts, visiting a few friends, and even getting a relaxing arm massage at Sacred Arm Massage & Healing Arts. Floating home, I looked around at all the happy fish. It was such a beautiful day. The sun was glistening brightly through the waves. There were even surfboards overhead, and not a shark sighting all day. The small fish were playing with each other and singing carols in anticipation of what tonight would bring. The bigger fish were holding hands and sneaking kisses, just as giddy as the little ones.

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Finally making it home, I put on my favorite Michael Bubble Christmas album and started wrapping presents. Later that evening, I enjoyed the sunset in my back sand where I could see the human’s Folly Christmas tree off in the distance. Those humans are so creative! Who would think to put a Christmas tree on the beach anyway? ?After Christmas Eve dinner and appeasing carol singers who literally would not leave until I gave them figgy pudding –good thing I picked up dates at the store– I finally settled in to rest until Christmas day.

However, it was a restless sleep, and when I did drift off I had crazy dreams. One was of a psychedelic octopus. He just kind of joyfully floated in one spot, smiling and waving almost glowing in the surf. And then I woke up. Then there was the dream of a sandcastle Santa Claus. Had I seen the humans building one on the beach? Had Santa visited me and I sleepily caught him? Was Santa Claus really made out of sand? The psychedelic octopus seemed to make more sense than that! Maybe I was just as excited as every fish else that I had seen the day before. After all, Christmas is my most favorite of all the holidays. And even after all these years, I have never stopped believing. I gave into my excitement and floated out of bed, cranked up the Bubble, and got ready for the day.

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As I put on my funny Santa attire, the smile that would remain ever present for the day crept across my face. How silly of me to think there would be sleep on the eve of today of all days! The doorbell rang. My friends and family had arrived. It was the beginning of another perfect Christmas Under the Folly Sea.

From our family to yours,
Happy Christmas, Merry Everything!

Never Stop Believing

Getting to Know Philadelphia Alley

 

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By Minta Pavliscsak

If there is one thing Charleston, South Carolina will never be lacking, it is charm. In historic downtown Charleston, every street, store front, restaurant, park, and even alleyway has a way to make you point and say “awe”. Then, as if an automatic response, your camera is out taking pictures before you even realize it.

Follow us as we take a stroll down Philadelphia Alley and see alleyways as only Charleston knows how to do them.

 

 

This charming alley can be found between Queen Street and Cumberland Street. Often overlooked, Philadelphia Alley is one of the many hidden treasures Charleston offers. Dating back to 1776, Cow’s Alley as it was originally called, was access to rental homes behind Francis Kinloch’s house. He renamed it Kinloch’s Court after he widened it.

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This alley has seen two fires in its lifetime, including the infamous fire of 1796, and another in 1810. Holding true to its name, The City of Brotherly Love stood by Charleston’s side by donating?financially to aid in rebuilding this area in 1811.

 

What a more proper thank you than to forever give this beautiful strip of canopy covered, cobblestone refuge from the heat during the summer months, and the best place to listen to the bells of St. Phillips Church the honor of the name Philadelphia Alley.

 

Many locals refer to this passageway as Dueler’s Alley. Back when gentleman settled their disputes with pistols twenty-one paces away, this alley was the perfect setting in Charleston to do so. One of the most famous stories is of one man’s love and what he did to prove said love. Dr. Joseph Brown Ladd, known as the whistling doctor would eventually meet his demise as a result of a duel with Ralph Isaacs in 1786.

 

Many local ghost tour companies will tell the tale of the Whistling Doctor, and some Charlestonians have even said to have heard faint whistling while walking down the alley alone. Today you will find a tranquil, picturesque setting where each person you meet will pass you by with a friendly smile and nod. So as Robert Frost first suggest, take the road less traveled and be sure to explore Charleston’s only Philadelphia Alley.

 

 

 

 

 

What the Charleston Lady Was Doing While Her Other Half Watched the Epic Finale of the 2016 World Series

By, Minta Pavliscsak
  • Enjoying the crisp fall evening on the patio while sipping a glass of wine and sneaking a few pieces of the kid’s Halloween candy.
  • Hanging out with her man because she is after all a true Southern Bell, and supporting his interests is just part of what we do. {…even if there may be texts exchanged with the bestie about how cute that one player’s butt looks in his uniform.}
  • Sleeping – hopefully not interrupting any important plays with the occasional, adorable snore.
  • Finally catching up on her DVR shows on the smaller T.V.
  • Using her man’s credit card to buy those shoes she has been eyeing for quite some time now. -How that matching belt made its way into the shopping bag is a mystery to her!-
  • Constantly refilling the chip bowl and mixed nuts while making countless pigs in blankets, all while keeping the coffee table her honey and his friends are huddled around clear of empty beer cans and bottle caps.
  • Taking advantage of an empty house to sit around in her favorite baggy, ripped sweats and bleached stained hoodie for once…crazy hair and all.
  • Getting hit on at Mac’s Place -unbeknownst to her significant other- by some guy rooting for the opposing team, despite the fact that her and her man have been sharing a plate of nachos since the second inning and he keeps drinking her beer because he refuses to take his eyes off of the screen.
  • Pretending to show interest in the game but instead, plotting her moment when she gets to use the line that starts with, “Honey remember that time when I sat up with you after midnight watching the World Series?”
  • Cheering right along by her love’s side because she has always been a Cubs fan.

 

World Series 2016 Video